Sample Essay on Jesus is Lord

The table below identifies some of the titles and names used by believers in identifying the duality of Jesus Christ (Cottrell, 2002). The titles under the section “Jesus” identifies the human natures of Christ while the titles under the section “Lord” identifies the divine nature of Christ.

Jesus (Human Nature)

  1. Jesus as the King of King and Lord of Lords (1st Timothy 6:15 and the Book of Revelation 19:16)
  2. Jesus as the Judge (Acts 10:42 and the Book of 2nd Timothy 4: 8)
  3. Jesus as the Son of Man (the Book of john 5: 27)
  4. Jesus as the Prince of peace (the Book of Isaiah 9:6)
Lord (Devine Nature)

  1. Jesus as the Son of God (the book of Luke 1:35 and the book of John 1: 49)
  2. Jesus as the Word (John 1:1 and in the Book of 1st John 5:7 to 8)
  3. Jesus as the word of God (the Book of Revelation 19: 12 to 13)
  4. Jesus as the Word of Life (the Book of 1st John 1: 1)
  5. Jesus as the Beginning and End (Alpha and Omega) (the Book of Revelation 1: 8 and 22:13)
  6. Jesus identified as Emmanuel (the Book of Isaiah 9; 6 and Mathew 1:23)
  7. Christ defines His identity as “I Am (The Book of John 8:58 and the Book of Exodus 3: 14)

 

In Mathew Chapter 16: 15, Jesus Christ asks His disciples a basic Christological question, “Who do you say I am?” Within the study of Christology, the Bible gives over 200 names and titles used to identify the human and divine nature of Jesus Christ (Cottrell, 2002). Most of these names give the nature of Jesus Christ, His position on earth and in heaven (the tri-unity of God) as well as the kind of work he did on earth on behalf of human beings (Cottrell, 2002). Christology is a study into the nature of Jesus Christ pegged on several questions to the disciples about His true identity (Cottrell, 2002). For example, the question in Mathew Chapter 16:15 resembles an earlier question Jesus had asked the disciples, “Who do people say I am?” when John the Baptists asked to Known if Jesus was the Messiah, Jesus answers the John by telling the disciples to inform John of the wonderful work they have seen or heard Jesus perform (Cottrell, 2002). This and several other citations tells us more about the nature of Jesus as Human and Divine.

The divine Nature of Christ (Lord)

Jesus as the Son of God: this description is given in the book of Luke 1:35 and in the book of John 1: 49, where the Christ is referred to as the only begotten son of God. The Phrase son of God appears in the New Testament 42 time only to affirm the deity of Christ as the Lord (Jeffrey, 1992). This title is significant to Christians because it shows the amount of love God has for a human being to an extent that He sends His only son to die and save the human life

Jesus as the Word: this identity is given in John 1:1 and in the Book of 1st John 5:7 to 8. The identity symbolizes the divine nature of Christ as the second in command after God (Jeffrey, 1992). “Through Him, every other thing was created.” This title describes the strength of word, and through the word Christians can achieve beyond the impossibilities.

Jesus as the word of God: the mysteries behind His Lordship is only known to Jesus Christ and that is why His divine person has not been revealed to any other person, but to himself in the Book of Revelation 19: 12 to 13. Jesus is the word of God; a title that shows the close divinity of Jesus and God, which means that Jesus is God.

Jesus as the Word of Life: in the Book of 1st John 1: 1, the divine nature of Christ is portrayed as a person who cannot only speak a word that leads to eternal life, but as the very word that leads to a life full of joy and fulfillment (Jeffrey, 1992). This title reminds Christians that Jesus speak life and restores broken souls since in Him as the word of life, Christians find solace.

Jesus as the Beginning and End (Alpha and Omega): in the Book of Revelation 1: 8 and 22:13, Jesus identifies himself as the beginning and the end to all things; and end that cannot result from any other being, but from God (Jeffrey, 1992). The phrase “Alpha and Omega” cannot apply to any other being but only to God of eternality. Jesus is the beginner of human race and everything seen on earth and also retains the power to end all that he had created or started (Jeffrey, 1992).

Jesus identified as Emmanuel: the Book of Isaiah 9; 6 and Mathew 1:23 talks of Christ as God in the form of man and would descend to live among His people (Jeffrey, 1992). The phrase “in the form of man” identifies Chris as one whose traits are completely different from man’s traits.

Christ defines His identity as “I Am: The Book of John 8:58 and the Book of Exodus 3: 14 have certain similarities. In the Book of John 8:58, the Jews tried to stone Jesus for calling Himself “I am”; an Identity that was used by God in the Book of Exodus when he appeared to the Israelites through Moses (Jeffrey, 1992). The Jews took this to be blasphemous since they understood that He was declaring himself God, to be prices the Unchanging Jehovah.

& Lambert, 2004). As a son of man, Jesus is identified as the first son of Mary and Joseph, though the scripture maintains that He was conceived through the Holy Spirit. This identification is import

The Human Nature of Chris (Jesus)

Jesus as the King of King and Lord of Lords: the Book of 1st Timothy 6:15 and the Book of Revelation 19:16 recognize Jesus in His human nature as king with dominion over all earthly authorities, over all kings and rulers (In Hastings, In Selbie & Lambert, 2004). The title “King of kings and Lord of Lords” is important in the life history of Jesus Christ since it illustrated Jesus’ unlimited authority on the earth (In Hastings, In Selbie & Lambert, 2004). In the eve of His betrayal, Jesus cautions Peter to draw back his word since the war he was facing was not a war of flesh (In Hastings, In Selbie & Lambert, 2004). Not even the Pharisees would prevent Jesus from accomplishing His mission to save human race as there King. Jesus title at an earthy king was tested before Herod and Pilate, and according to the Pharisees, Jesus was encouraging his followers to defy the law and not to pay taxes (In Hastings, In Selbie & Lambert, 2004).

Jesus as the Judge: in the book of Acts 10:42 and in the Book of 2nd Timothy 4: 8, Jesus is identified as the Judge (In Hastings, In Selbie & Lambert, 2004). Jesus was the God’s Chosen Judge who would judge the world and finally dispense the rewards of eternity to the righteous.

Jesus as the Son of Man: the scripture in the Book of john 5: 27 contrasts Jesus as both the son of man and the son of God (In Hastings, In Selbie & Lambert, 2004). The Book of John therefore affirms the human nature of Jesus Christ, which exists alongside His divinity (In Hastings, In Selbie ant in the life of Christians because it helps explain some of the challenges people go through in their human form and as a family (In Hastings, In Selbie & Lambert, 2004). In his human form Jesus experienced the same challenges people would experience.

Jesus as the Prince of peace: in the Book of Isaiah 9:6, Jesus is referred to as the Prince of peace. This title is important because it signifies the role of Jesus as the mediator of human race with God (In Hastings, In Selbie & Lambert, 2004). Jesus did not come to create peace between nations or put to an end the worldly wars, buts create peace between God and man. Before His interventions, God and man were separated by since, but through Jesus’ death, the sinners were reconciled to a holy God.

References

Cottrell, J. (2002). The faith once for all: Bible doctrine for today. Joplin, Mo: College Press Pub.

In Hastings, J., In Selbie, J. A., & Lambert, J. C. (2004). A dictionary of Christ and the Gospels. Honolulu, Hawaii: University Press of the Pacific.

Jeffrey, D. L. (1992). A dictionary of biblical tradition in English literature. Grand Rapids, Mich