Open Always
Email: support@globalcompose.com Call Now! +1-315 515-4588
Open Always
Email: support@globalcompose.com Call Now! +1-315 515-4588

Sample Essay on Canberra Press Gallery

This sample paper on (Sample Essay on Canberra Press Gallery) was uploaded by one our contributors and does not necessarily reflect how our professionals write our papers. If you would like this paper removed from our website, please contact us our Contact Us Page.

A Database of over Million Scholarly Resources. Start your Search Now

Sample Essay on Canberra Press Gallery

Introduction

            Before the development of the modern media platforms such as television and the internet, Canberra Press Gallery was in existence to offer Australian political news[1]. Canberra press Gallery is also referred to as the Federal Parliamentary Press Gallery. Their main role of the Press is to oversee the federal politics, which are highlighted on the broadcast media, and the Australian prints. The Canberra Press Gallery was in existence since 1901[2]. They also play a significant role in the policymaking as they often respond to shifts in public opinion[3]. These journalists are also known to influence the policy agenda. Their critics dispute that the ministers and other sources on whom they rely for information, as they easily capture journalists.

Key concepts and terms

News media, newsgathering, media agenda, policy agenda, Press Gallery, political PR, ‘managing’ the media, media adviser, ‘sources’, leaks, background briefings, Gallery ‘hot house’,  Fourth Estate, ‘watchdog’ media, news round, sources

 

Background

The first Federal Parliamentary sitting was in 1901[4]. This is the period when Australia became federated and there was the first federal sitting in Melborne. The Gallery is made up of more than 180 journalists, support team of editors, camera crews, and producers. The role of this press is to report on the activities of the Australian Parliament[5]. It is also disputed that their position within parliament buildings creates a ‘herd instinct’. Politicians and their media advisers have certainly developed a series of underground and blatant public relations approaches to control the reporting of the political news. This reduces the ability of the Gallery to act as political controllers.

The Canberra Press Gallery comprises of 180 journalists, in addition to camera crew and other supporting staff[6]. The staff is accredited to work within Parliament House. They operate from bureaux housed on the floor just above the Senate. The Canberra press Gallery is an enclosed viewing area, which is located above the Senate chambers. It is also found above the House of Representatives. The Canberra Press Gallery also refers to the group of Gallery journalists who have an interest on the Parliamentary processions[7].

The present Gallery President is David Speers while the Secretary is James Massola. These journalists usually have a daily sitting of one and a half hours for Question Time. The journalists also spend some time in their main gallery on the floor of the parliament. The Press Gallery also refers to the office space in the parliament. There are the television studios and the radio booths, which enable the journalists, compile their stories and communicate with their supporting editors. There are studios for main television networks such as the ABC, Channel Nine and the SBS[8]. The Canberra Press Gallery is the quarters for the print and online journals for the main newspapers such as the Australian Financial Review, the Courier Mail, and The Australian.

Roles and responsibilities of the Federal Press

            The main role of the Press Gallery is to watch and record the political proceedings of the national elected representatives and broadcast them nationally and internationally. Other than through television and radio channels, the present Press Gallery uses twitter, and internet to air the news. This body plays a major role in the parliament. Maintenance of the recorded and the spoken words of the leaders, together with the images and photographs are part of the assignments of the Press Gallery[9]. These records assist in informing the public of the activities and resolutions of the elected leaders and the Australian government[10].

As an essential component of democracy, the Federal Press Gallery plays a significant role in leadership. The public is able to build its trust and understanding of the proceedings. This is through informed historical records, which have been covered by the media. There is also an easier scrutiny of the information by the public. This scrutiny enables the electorate to make informed decisions. Hence, the Federal Press Gallery controls the politicians by being watchful of their actions.

Relationship between the Press Journalists and the federal Politicians

The relationship between the journalists and the politicians is meant to symbiotic[11]. Journalists and the politicians exploits each other.  This association is despite the personal contact and the game-playing that results to political news[12]. However, these two groups have been struggling over issues such as the upcoming technology. The relationship nevertheless remains to be a significant contributor to the value of the information relayed. This is because the two groups are part of the democratic communication process.

To the backbenchers, there is little significance on the national coverage. Those that receive extensive coverage dislike the press due to the damage it causes on the trust of the party members. For most of the backbenchers, the Press strikes a balance between the party, the constituent, and the national image[13]. This results to personal consideration of the desired national coverage. This balance is however difficult to maintain. Backbenchers on the other hand offer significant information to the journalists on the party politics and the machinations as they occur. The journalists on the other hand have a contrasting agreement on the essence of the national coverage. Most of them agree that the access to the information, which is deemed privy, is essential[14]. The assessments of the constituent and the party mood lead to the policy developments.

The symbiotic relationship therefore offers a continuous cynicism from the parties. This assists in evaluating their motivations all through. In addition, the association results to healthy skepticism and a destructive pervasion of each other’s intention. It reduces the evaluation of the value of the roles played by each other in achieving the political communication process. It is also perceived to result to pre-occupation with the communication process. To the individual backbenchers, the gallery plays a varied role. This is to be determined by the personal desires of the politicians, in addition to their experience in managing the national media. A politician can establish an essential understanding of the risks and benefits of the relationship that exists between them through a personal contact with the gallery[15].

Conclusion

            The Canberra Press Gallery was in existence by 1901. Its main role is to offer Australian political news. Canberra press Gallery is also referred to as the Federal Parliamentary Press Gallery. The Canberra Press Gallery comprises of 180 journalists, in addition to camera crew and other supporting staff. The staff is accredited to work within Parliament House. The journalists play a significant role in the policymaking as they often respond to shifts in public opinion. These journalists are also known to influence the policy agenda. Their critics dispute that the ministers and other sources on whom they rely for information, easily capture journalists. It is also disputed that their position within parliament buildings creates a ‘herd instinct’. Politicians and their media advisers have certainly developed a series of underground and blatant public relations approaches to control the reporting of the political news. This reduces the ability of the Gallery to act as political controllers.

 

 

Bibliography

Chen, P. 2012. “Media politics’. In R.Smith, A. Vromen & I. Cook (eds) Contemporary Politics in Australia. Port Melbourne: Cambridge University Press. Pages 390-314

Craig, G. 2003. Media, Politics and Public Life. Sydney: Allen and Unwin. Pages 42-5, 82-5 & 98-102.

 Drum, Martin. ‘Media and Politics’. In M. Drum  & J. Tate   Politics in Australia. South Yarra: Palgrave Macmillan. 2012. Pages 403

Economou, N. &  S. Tanner 2008.  Media, Power and Politics in Australia. Frenchs Forest: Pearson. Pages 106-110 & ch.7

Hollander, R.  ‘The media and Australian politics’. In R. Eccleston, P. Williams & R. Hollander  Foundations of Australian Politics. Frenchs Forest: Pearson. 2006. Pages 620

Singleton, G. et al.  Australian Political Institutions. 10th  edn. Frenchs Forest: Pearson.  Ch. 12 ‘Political communication’. 2013. Pages 102-123

Tiffen, R. 2000. ‘The news media and Australian politics: contemporary challenges for Australian democracy in the information age’. In P.Boreham, G. Stokes & R. Hall eds. The Politics of Australian Society. Sydney: Longman. Pages 640-56

Vromen, A. & K. Gelber. 2004. Powerscape: Contemporary Australian Political Practice. Sydney: Allen and Unwin. Ch. 9 ‘News and media’. Pages 214. 312, 402-409

 

 

[1] Chen, P. 2012. “Media politics’. In R.Smith, A. Vromen & I. Cook (eds) Contemporary Politics in Australia. Port Melbourne: Cambridge University Press. Page 402

[2] Ibid 412

[3] Tiffen, R. 2000. ‘The news media and Australian politics: contemporary challenges for Australian democracy in the information age’. In P.Boreham, G. Stokes & R. Hall eds. The Politics of Australian Society. Sydney: Longman. Pages 646

 

[4] Drum, Martin. ‘Media and Politics’. In M. Drum  & J. Tate   Politics in Australia. South Yarra: Palgrave Macmillan. 2012. Pages 403

[5] Singleton, G. et al.  Australian Political Institutions. 10th  edn. Frenchs Forest: Pearson.  Ch. 12 ‘Political communication’. 2013. Pages 102

 

[6] Economou, N. &  S. Tanner 2008.  Media, Power and Politics in Australia. Frenchs Forest: Pearson. Pages 106-110 & ch.7

 

[7] Ibid 120

 

[8] Miragliotta et al &  Young, S. ‘Creating Election News’ in How Australia Decides. Cambridge University Press. 2011. Pages 107-8, 118-122 &124-5.

[9]Drum, Martin. ‘Media and Politics’. In M. Drum  & J. Tate   Politics in Australia. South Yarra: Palgrave Macmillan. 2012. Pages 403

 

[10] Chen, P. 2012. “Media politics’. In R.Smith, A. Vromen & I. Cook (eds) Contemporary Politics in Australia. Port Melbourne: Cambridge University Press. Pages 390

 

[11] Hollander, R.  ‘The media and Australian politics’. In R. Eccleston, P. Williams & R. Hollander  Foundations of Australian Politics. Frenchs Forest: Pearson. 2006. Pages 620

 

[12] Tiffen, R. 2000. ‘The news media and Australian politics: contemporary challenges for Australian democracy in the information age’. In P.Boreham, G. Stokes & R. Hall eds. The Politics of Australian Society. Sydney: Longman. Pages 640-56

[13] Craig, G. 2003. Media, Politics and Public Life. Sydney: Allen and Unwin. Pages 42-5, 82-5 & 98-102.

[14] Chen, P. 2012. “Media politics’. In R.Smith, A. Vromen & I. Cook (eds) Contemporary Politics in Australia. Port Melbourne: Cambridge University Press. Pages 390-314

 

[15] Vromen, A. & K. Gelber. 2004. Powerscape: Contemporary Australian Political Practice. Sydney: Allen and Unwin. Ch. 9 ‘News and media’. Pages 214. 312, 402-409

 

Sharing is: CARING

Are you looking for homework writing help? Click on Order Now button below to Submit your assignment details.

Homework Writing Help
We Can Help you with this Assignment right now!
Sample Essay on Canberra Press Gallery

Are you looking for homework writing help on (Sample Essay on Canberra Press Gallery)?Well, you can either use the sample paper provided to write your paper or you could contact us today for an original paper. If you are looking for an assignment to submit, then click on ORDER NOW button or contact us today. Our Professional Writers will be glad to write your paper from scratch.

We ensure that assignment instructions are followed, the paper is written from scratch. If you are not satisfied by our service, you can either request for refund or unlimited revisions for your order at absolutely no extra pay. Once the writer has completed your paper, the editors check your paper for any grammar/formatting/plagiarism mistakes, then the final paper is sent to your email.

Privacy| Confidentiality

Sample Essay on Canberra Press Gallery

We do not share your personal information with any company or person. We have also ensured that the ordering process is secure; you can check the security feature in the browser. For confidentiality purposes, all papers are sent to your personal email. If you have any questions, contact us any time via email, live chat or our phone number.

Our Clients Testimonials

  • I appreciate help on the assignment. It was hard for me but am good to go now

    Impact of pollution on Environment
  • Am happy now having completed the very difficult assignment

    Creative Message Strategies
  • Your writer did a fine job on the revisions. The paper is now ok

    Ethics: Theory and Practice
  • The paper was so involving but am happy it is done. Will reach you with more assignments

    Title: Privatization in or of America
  • I expected perfection in terms of grammar and I am happy. Lecturer is always on our head but was pleased with my paper. Once again, thanks a lot

    Title: Bundaberg Inquiry
  • The paper looks perfect now, thank to the writer

    Health Care Systems
  • You helped me complete several other tasks as you handled paper. wonna thank you

    Critique Paper on Political Change

Related Articles

Sample Essay on Canberra Press Gallery

Get more from us…

Would you like this sample paper to be sent to your email or would you like to receive weekly articles on how to write your assignments? You can simply send us your request on how to write your paper and we will email you a free guide within 24-36 hours. Kindly subscribe below!

Email Address: support@globalcompose.com