What was the South Carolina Legislature Protesting

What was the South Carolina Legislature Protesting

“Our system, then, consists of two distinct and independent Governments. The general powers, expressly delegated to the General Government, are subject to its sole and separate control; and the States cannot, without violating the constitutional compact, interpose their authority to check, or in any manner to counteract its movements, so long as they are confined to the proper sphere. So, also, the peculiar and local powers reserved to the States are subject to their exclusive control; nor can the General Government interfere, in any manner, with them, without violating the Constitution. If it be conceded, as it must be by every one who is the least conversant with our institutions, that the sovereign powers delegated are divided between the General and State Governments, and that the latter hold their portion by the same tenure as the former, it would seem impossible to deny to the States the right of deciding on the infractions of their powers, and the proper remedy to be applied for their correction. The right of judging, in such cases, is an essential attribute of sovereignty—of which the States cannot be divested without losing their sovereignty itself—and being reduced to a subordinate corporate condition. “
South Carolina Exposition and Protest
The South Carolina Exposition and Protest, and the crisis of Nullification that it announced, brought together constitutional, political-economic, and sectional conflicts that had shaped the early Republic from its founding in the 1780s. Exactly what was the South Carolina legislature protesting? What was the logic of their argument? What were the underlying social and political conflicts that both made them willing to push to the brink of civil war and for the rest of the nation to respond so powerfully? How, in other words, did the Nullification Crisis reveal the fundamental contradictions of the early American Republic in the aftermath of the War of 1812.
I understand that this is a large question. To answer if effectively please focus your discussion on the most important issues and try to be sure to accomplish the following things:
1) Be sure to convey your argument immediately in the first paragraph of your paper. I should be able to understand exactly what you are arguing as soon as I have read your opening. In other words, don’t repeat the series of questions but tell me what you think that the answers to them are.
2) Be sure to develop your points with evidence. Each paragraph should contain one analytical idea (expressed in the topic sentence) and then the rest of the paragraph should develop or substantiate that idea. Try not to leave your ideas undeveloped; they deserve to be explained and supported