U.S.-Mexico Relations: Past and Prelude of Globalization

U.S.-Mexico Relations:

Past and Prelude of Globalization

Instructions:

  1. Plain language as simple as possible, no need to use advanced vocabulary, high-level expressions, and long difficult sentences.
  2. Content should be concise and comprehensive(Each sentence must be meaningful and useful, all non-essentials should be cut out)

Sources can be used for reference:

  • class study guide-google doc https://docs.google.com/document/d/1FLQkphA8VmLjv3PAyB0sy_3Vl3X0H5F5HzrEsVhlMzY/edit?usp=sharing
  • lectures
  • readings

SECTION (1) 2 pages

Explain the differences in what Cardoso and Falleto mean by the “period of outward expansion” and the period of “nationalism and populism.”  Describe the different role of Mexico compared to other Latin American countries during these periods.

Feel free to quote from text used in class, or other relevant text, including equations, diagrams, and numerical examples.

SECTION (2) 5 pages

Describe in detail the rise and fall of the economic and political regimes of the internal and external relations between the United States and Mexico during two of the following historical periods.  Cite references from our readings(!!!) to substantiate your points.

(a) Early Capitalism and the Rupture of the Colonial Pact

(b) Imperialism and Outward Expansion 1850s-1910s

(c) Postwar Fordism and ISI 1930s-1970s

(d) Neoliberalism and NAFTA 1980s-200

List of readings

Week 1: The Political Economy of Uneven Development

  1. Pomeranz, Kenneth. The Great Divergence: China, Europe and the Making of the Modern World Economy. Princeton University Press,
  2. Cardoso and Faletto, Dependency and Development in Latin America: READ: Intro and Chapter
  3. Luis Bertola, Institutions and the Historical Roots of Latin American Divergence
  4. Raul Hinojosa and Edward Telles. “The Trump Paradox’ in in The Trump Paradox:  Migration, Trade and Racialized Politics in U.S.-Mexico Relations, edited by Raul Hinojosa and Edward Telles, UC Press,

Week 2: Territorial Expansion, the Second Conquest, and the Origins of Uneven Development

  1. Raúl Hinojosa-Ojeda (1998). “North American Integration and Concepts of Human Rights: Reflections on 150 Years of Treaty Making.” Southwestern Journal of Law and Trade in the Americas. Paper presented at a Conference on “Understanding the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo on Its 150th Anniversary”, Southwestern University School of Law, Los Angeles, California, Friday, February 6,
  2. Monroy, Douglas, Thrown Among Strangers: The Making of Mexican Culture in Frontier California. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1990. READ: from “Spain and the Indians of Alta California” [3-18].
  3. Turner, Frederick, “Xenophobia and the War 1847”, in Raat, Dirk, Mexico: From Independence to Revolution, 1810-1910. Lincoln, University of Nebraska Press, 1982. READ [pp. 91-98].
  4. Cardoso and Faletto, Dependency and Development in Latin America: READ: Chapter
  5. David Browing. El Salvador: Landscape and Society. 1st ed. London: Oxford University Press, 1971. Chapt

Week 3: Integration and Revolution in the 19th Century

Assignment #1 Due: Paper topic: Include the title and at least one paragraph about your topic, if undecided about your topic than write about your alternative topics as well.

  1. Vasquez, Josefina Zoraida, and Meyer, Lorenzo, the United States and Mexico. Chicago, University of Chicago Press, 1985. READ: chapter 2, 3, 4, 5
  2. Lorenzo Meyer, “The Fall of Diaz and the End of a Good Relationship: 19041910” [95-102].
  3. Krugman, Paul R. The Great Unraveling: Losing Our Way in the New Century. New York:

W.W. Norton, 2003. Print.

  1. Lenin, Vladimir Ilyich. Imperialism: The Highest Stage of Capitalism. London: Penguin, 2010. Print.
  2. Cardoso and Faletto, Dependency and Development in Latin America: READ: Chapter
  3. Lindo, Hector; Weak Foundations: The Economy of El Salvador in the Nineteenth Century, University of California Press. READ Chapters 6 an

Week 4: From Depression to Post-War Boom

Assignment #2 Due: Outline and bibliography of final paper

  1. Cardoso and Faletto, Dependency and Development in Latin America: READ: Chapter
  2. Nora Hamilton, The Limits to State Autonomy: Post-Revolutionary Mexico. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1982. READ: Chapters 1 and
  3. Aguilar Camin, Hector, and Meyer, Lorenzo, In the Shadow of the Mexican Revolution: Contemporary Mexican History, 1910-1989. Austin, University of Texas Press, 1993. READ: “The Mexican Miracle: 1940-1968” [159-198].
  4. Paige, Jeffery Coffee and Power: Revolution and the Rise of Democracy in Central America. Harvard University Press, 1997. READ Chapters 1 and 3

Week 5: From debt Crisis to the Washington Consensus

  1. Aguilar Camin, Hector, and Meyer, Lorenzo, In the Shadow of the Mexican Revolution: Contemporary Mexican History, 1910-1989. Austin, University of Texas Press, 1993. READ: “The Fading of the Miracle: 1968-1984” [199-250].
  2. Robert R. Kaufman, The Politics of Debt in Argentina, Brazil and Mexico (Berkeley: Institute for International Studies) 1988. READ: Chapter Two [59104].
  3. Clark W Reynolds, “Fissures in the Volcano: Central American Economic Prospects.” In Toward a Political Economy of Development: A Rational Choice Perspective, edited by Robert
  4. Bates, 206-236. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1988.
  5. Paige, Jeffery. “Land Reform and Agrarian Revolution in El Salvador.” LARR, Vol. 31, No. 2 (1996).
  6. Blecker, Robert A. “What Policies Make Sense in a U.S.-Mexico Trade Deal?” in The Trump Paradox: Migration, Trade and Racialized Politics in U.S.-Mexico Relations, edited by Raul Hinojosa and Edward Telles, UC Press,

Week 6: North America Free Trade Agreement and