Managing Complex Projects, Products and Systems (890N1)

Managing Complex Projects, Products, and Systems (890N1)

Assessment 1 – Report

The Report

For this assessment (report), students are required to select a complex project to apply theories/ frameworks from the lectures and group work in the seminars as indicated below. Students can choose any complex project discussed in Seminar 2 (Critical Analysis of Complex Projects), and additional marks will be considered for students who choose different ones. The project is supposed to be ‘complex’ and a reasonable amount of information should be accessible in order to make it possible to conduct an appropriate application of the proposed theories/frameworks. The complex project may be one that has already been undertaken or one that is currently underway.

The report has the 6 (six) following sections, and the indicative number of marks is shown for each section:

  1. (Practice) Apply the NTCP (Diamond) Model as elaborated by Shenhar and Dvir (2007)[1] to the complex project you selected. Students should justify their categorization of choices. A discussion on the required vs. actual management style may be done if possible.

[15 marks]

  1. (Practice) Apply the 5 (five) dimensions of project success identified by Shenhar and Dvir (2007). Students should discuss the definition of project success for the selected complex project as a multifaceted concept beyond traditional iron triangle constraints (time/schedule, cost/budget, and scope/quality).

[15 marks]

  1. (Theory) Reflect on the NTCP/Diamond Model. Students are required to reflect on the qualities and potential limitations of this model. Students may suggest possible improvements to the model based on the application to the selected complex project.

[30 marks]

  1. (Theory) Reflect on the 5 (five) dimensions of project success. Students are required to reflect on the qualities and limitations of the five dimensions as they are proposed. Students may reflect on the breadth and depth of the five dimensions, for example:
    1. Is any dimension missing (breadth)?
    2. Should any dimension be further specified into categories and sub-categories (depth)?
    3. Is there any improvement to suggest? (e.g. could/should these dimensions be presented in a different way?)

The questions above are indicative. Students may reflect on any issue/point that they deem appropriate and relevant considering the selected complex project.

 [30 marks]

  1. (Self-Reflection) Reflect on how the knowledge, application, and reflection on these theories/frameworks may influence your future practice. For example, you may reflect on how the NTCP/Diamond Model may influence your management practice when working with projects in the future. Also, you may reflect on how the different dimensions of project success can broaden your perspective, influence your choices/decision-making on projects beyond delivering on time, on budget, and to specification.

The suggestions above are indicative. Students may reflect on any issue/point that they deem appropriate and relevant.

[5 marks]

  1. (Self-Reflection) Reflect on your group work in the seminars so far (e.g. joys and difficulties, diversity, cooperation, and motivation). How could the group work have been better and/or have been done in a better way?

The suggestions above are indicative. Students may reflect on any issue/point that they deem appropriate and relevant.

[5 marks]

 

The structure of the report can be based on the 6 (six) sections above. This report accounts for 30% of the total mark for this module.

The word count is 1,000 words (+/- 10%).

References do not count towards the word count. And students are expected to use one reference system (e.g. Harvard system) consistently.

Assessment Criteria

The marks shown for each of the 6 (six) sections are indicative and, on the whole, the report will be assessed considering the marking scheme as indicated below.

Submission

Please refer to your own Assessment Deadlines in Sussex Direct and/or Canvas for all submission details. Innovation. Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Press.