Based on your school’s curriculum and assessment, propose an adapted curriculum, and critically discuss why it should be adapted to cater for your students.

Individual Term Paper (60%)
1. Your paper should be around 2500 words.
2. Based on your school’s curriculum and assessment, propose an adapted curriculum, and critically discuss why it should be adapted to cater for your students. Please justify the adaptations you propose with reference to existing literature.
3. The format of this paper should follow APA style. The word limit for the abstract is 150.Appendix 1
Scoring Rubric of Individual Term Paper (60%)
Abstract
(10 marks) A brief and comprehensive summary of all the contents of the paper within the word limit (10)
A brief and comprehensive summary of all the contents of the paper, but exceeded the word limit (8) A brief summary of the major ideas of the contents of the paper within the word limit (7)
A brief summary of the major ideas of the contents of the paper but exceeded the word limit (5) A brief summary of some of the contents of the paper within the word limit (4)
A brief summary of some of the contents of the paper but exceeded the word limit (2)
Introduction
(5 marks) Vague description of the paper’s theme. (1) Clearly named the theme of the paper. (topic/problem) (5) Described the structure of the paper. (5)
Main content of paper
(30 marks)

Based on your own school’s curriculum and assessment, propose an adapted curriculum
 Described the background information of your school’s curriculum and assessment. (1 to 3)
 Assessed the needs for an adapted curriculum in relation to inclusive practices of teaching and learning. (1 to 3)
 Discussed conceptual contribution of various scholars. (1 to 3)
 Compare and evaluate the conceptual contribution of various scholars in relation to the adapted curriculum and inclusive in your school. (1 to 3)
 Provided a proposed adapted curriculum. (5)
 Based on your proposed adapted curriculum, discuss and evaluate the feasibility of applying the conceptual contribution of various scholars. (1 to 10)
 Convincing argument. Integrated the discussion with a coherent application of relevant literature (1 to 3)
Conclusion
(10 marks)  Unclear or vague standpoint. (1 to 3)
 Adequate summary of main issues and clear statement of one’s own view. (1 to 3)
 Insightful conclusion based on critical discussion and existing literature. (1 to 4)
APA style and Reference
(5 marks) Some important ideas and quotations are not referenced. (2) Adequate reference for major argument and information sources. (3) Reference is systematic and follow APA style. (5)

References:
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Friend, M., & Bursuck, W. D. (2002). Including students with special needs: A practical guide for classroom teachers. Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon.
Giangreco, M. F., & Doyle, M. B. (2007). Quick-guides to inclusion: Ideas for educating students with disabilities. Baltimore, MD: Brookes Publishing Company.
Hall, T. E., Meyer, A., Rose, D. H. (Eds). (2012). Universal Design for Learning in the Classroom: Practical Applications. New York: Guilford.
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Tomlinson, C. A. (2017). How to Differentiate Instruction in Academically Diverse Classrooms. 3rd ed. Alexandria, VA: ASCD.
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Vaughn, S., Bos, C. S., & Schumm, J. S. (2000). Teaching exceptional, diverse, and at-risk students in the general education classroom. Boston: Allyn & Bacon