Assignment 4 Online Discussion 1: Family

Assignment 4 Online Discussion 1: Family (10 marks)

This is the first of three online discussions that you are required to complete. There are two tasks in each web discussion and you must complete both tasks to get full discussion marks. All three of your discussions will count for 10% of your overall course grade and will be awarded at the end of the course. In both parts, provide evidence and reasons to support your position.

  1. From your learning journal, review your answer to Activity 2 under Topic 1 in this unit (Me in Context: An Autobiography). Then have a few conversations with friends and relatives on the importance of family in their lives and on how people define family. Post a comment (around 400 words) answering the following questions: In what way did you find that people in your community define family? Does family have a big role in people’s lives? In what way and why?
  2. Respond to one of the comments posted by another student (no more than 200 words). Do you agree with their comment? Are there points of convergence and points of divergence between your opinion and the one expressed in this peer’s posting? What are they? If there is no posting for you to comment on right away, keep checking back right up until you finish the course.

Peer Posting

Importance of Family

by MINGSHAN TANG – Sunday, 29 March 2020, 1:38 AM

In my community, most people define family as the people they always spend time with, the people they find in what they consider as their home. The family is considered the basic unit of society. It is also one of the strongest forces in socialization. With these, most people believe that family has a huge role in their lives. Several people stated that their values, attitudes, and behaviors have been primarily shaped by their families whom they spent time with as they grew old. This gives emphasis on the significance of good familial relations of children with their parents and other family members in order to have desirable traits when they grow up. Studies show that weak interpersonal interactions in the family, migration from rural to urban places, lack of parental supervision, and instability of the family negatively affect children (Abdullatif & Ali, 2016). Theorists have pointed out that the attitudes of parents, the way of monitoring the children, the family’s structure, and the organization itself are the common family problems. For instance, if a smaller structure is provided to the children by the parents, the children are more likely to do undesirable actions. One study revealed that children follow the behaviors of their parents for it is what they perceive as acceptable (Nisar et al., 2015). The family is one of the main teachers of values and manners. Hence, it contributes greatly to the behaviors of a child in the later years. In addition to the traits and behaviors, the family also has a great impact on the individual socio-economic conditions of the family members. Socio-economic conditions, such as poverty, affect how the children in the family–if they are sent to schools by their parents to be educated or be asked to work instead to help the family. Nisar et al. (2015) suggested that personal insecurity and limitations related to the socio-economic status of an individual may, later on, result in violent and undesirable behaviors. Poverty is related to malnutrition, which could lead to a lack of energy, slow mental processing, and anxiety in children and adolescents. As such, the socio-economic status of the family has a huge impact on their way of living and on how the children are raised.

References

Abdullatif, F., & Ali, A. (2016). Factors affecting juvenile delinquency in Bahrain. Journal of General Practice04(01). doi:10.4172/2329-9126.1000229

Nisar, M., Ullah, S., Ali, M., & Alam, S. (2015). Juvenile delinquency: The influence of family, peer and economic factors on juvenile delinquents. Applied Science Reports9(1), 37-48. doi:10.15192/pscp.asr.2015.9.1.3748

Assignment 4 Online Discussion 2—Family Diversity (10 marks)

This is the second of three online discussions that you are required to complete. There are two tasks in each web discussion and you must complete both tasks to get full discussion marks. All three of your discussions will count for 10% of your overall course grade and will be awarded at the end of the course. In both parts, provide evidence and reasons to support your position.

  1. Review the reflexive activities in your learning journal for this unit (on social location, masculinity/femininity, diversity of generational friendship, non-heterosexuality, and accessibility). Post a comment (around 400 words) where you discuss what you learned in this unit about family diversity in Canada and how this relates to your own sense of identity and belonging. Is there anything that jumps out for you in what you learned on how the family lives of minorities are impacted by dominant societal and cultural expectations? You can focus your posting on one specific example.
  2. Respond to one of the comments posted by another student (no more than 200 words). Do you agree with their comment? Are there points of convergence and points of divergence between your opinion and the one expressed in this peer’s posting? What are they? If there is no posting for you to comment on right away, keep checking back right up until the end of the course.

Peer Posting

Online discussion 2

by Hannah Desjarlais – Friday, 6 March 2020, 5:42 PM

This unit really emphasized the learning of society straying away from the heteronormativity within households. We read in Mitchel (2017), that families are becoming more independent and more flexible on specific “roles” within the household. I learned that more families aren’t man, woman, and child in order to be called a family but can be composed of two women and no children, one man, and a child, or two men and their fur babies (animals) and still a family. We need to be mindful when it comes to gender roles with these different family dynamics, such as mommy and tot swimming classes or mommy and me yoga classes, which singles out families that have two fathers and “mommy” at all. When a father does attend these classes, they usually get looks or singled out for being the only one in the mommy and me classes. No matter what society tells us to be and how to think, we are becoming more accepting of straying from gender roles and heteronormativity.  For example, in my family, it is my mom, my sister, and myself, but I also have a family with my dad which holds my stepmother, my dad, and my two sisters. Together we are one family because we interact with each other, support each other and without everyone in our family, we just wouldn’t be able to be successful in all areas of the two households. Now, with my dad and his wife, and my mom all still being close and connected; this would be outside of the preferable family, like many of the examples above with same-sex couples with or without children. When learning about this, regardless of what is laws and legal within our country, it is really people’s thought processes and what is hard wired in their brain that tends to be the problem for modern-day families. If we want to be united in society, we need to change the way we think and react to people’s situations and not have a predetermined view of what it right or wrong in other people’s sexual preferences and lifestyles.

One thing that jumped out at me was the topic of disabilities within society and how many companies and buildings aren’t accessible for disabled people. An example of this is my work building for instance. We are a non-profit agency that offers all kinds of programs to the inner-city population with housing, family needs, financial needs, and job needs, where we welcome everyone who needs assistance. However, we are in a three-story building with only stairs leading into the building no elevators to navigate throughout the floors. I tried to have a family visit at my job before and found out that one of the children was in a wheelchair and he couldn’t join the rest of his family. How are we supposed to be inclusive to everyone but where we do our work and offer support is not accessible for everyone?

 

Mitchell, B.A. (2017). Family matters: An introduction to family sociology in Canada (3rd ed.). Toronto, ON: Canadian Scholars Press.

Assignment 4 Online Discussion 3: Gender Roles (10 marks)

In this course, there are three mandatory online discussions that you are required to complete. This is the third of three. There are two tasks in each web discussion and you must complete both tasks to get full discussion marks. All three of your discussions will count for 10% of your overall course grade and will be awarded at the end of the course. In both parts, provide evidence and reasons to support your position.

  1. Review the activities in your learning journal for this unit (on personal labor market attachment, domestic labour audit, screening prime time television, critical analysis of advertisement, analysis of personal consumption). Post a comment (around 400 words) where you discuss one specific way in which gender roles structure our lives (for example, in job choices, the effects of certain patterns of consumption, or the impact of cultural expectations of female beauty, but this list is not exhaustive). Focus your posting on one specific example and add evidence of the statements you make about social patterns.
  2. Respond to one of the comments posted by another student (no more than 200 words). Do you agree with their comment? Are there points of convergence and points of divergence between your opinion and the one expressed in this peer’s posting? What are they? If there is no posting for you to comment on right away, keep checking back right up until the end of the course.

 

Peer Posting

Online Discussion 3- Gender Roles

by Amanda George – Saturday, 14 March 2020, 9:38 AM

Online Discussion #3: Gender Roles 

In our western society, we are born and raised into a society with unrelenting ideologies concerning gender roles. The perception of what traditional roles and work are designated to each sex seems to be that of universal law. An interesting conversation occurred recently between my daughter and I. We were waiting to see her paediatrician, who has his office inside our local hospital. She mentioned in passing that the man in blue scrubs that walked by us must be a doctor. I questioned why she didn’t think that he could have been a nurse or another of the numerous roles that individuals play in a hospital setting. She didn’t have an answer for me, other than that; men are usually the doctors and women are the nurses. I like to think that I have adopted the ideas that any individual can become whatever they want in life and have raised my daughters on that notion. I see now how our perceptions are firmly governed by mass media and dominant societal ideologies. Can I, as a parent contest the dominant societal ideologies by advising my daughters that they can be and do anything they want, regardless of gender-biased limitations? I don’t think that I can remove the messages that they are privy to on an everyday basis. Still, I can be mindful of the conversations we have regarding the ideology of separate spheres and gendered norms in professions. It comes down to having open and active discussions with our children with the intent to learn from each other and safely express our individual opinions.

When we were in Alberta for summer vacation, we stayed at a couple of different motels in different small towns. One of the most interesting observations for me was to see the large team of men at one of the locations responsible for the stereotypically female maid service. We stayed there for three days, and on all three occasions, there was a woman at the front desk, but mainly a male staff taking care of all of the housekeeping. My daughters and I had a conversation about the roles of the employees at this establishment. My oldest daughter questioned whether or not ethnicity played a part in their ability to see past the traditional gender roles in work. I liked that we were able to open up a dialogue that questioned the dominant ideology. We do not have to create a ‘for’ or ‘against’ stance when teaching and guiding our children. We need to be open to listening to all sides and opinions if we want to be able to encourage this generation to be all that they can be.